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Diabetic Drug Invokana Could Cause Kidney Damage

Diabetic Drug Invokana Could Cause Kidney Damage

One of the most popular, fastest-growing diabetic treatments involves the use of a “miracle drug” known as Invokana. Like all other SGLT2 inhibitors, Invokana targets the kidneys to spur them into removing sugar from the body at a greater rate than normal. At first glance, this sounds incredibly promising for diabetics as it may help regulate blood sugar levels.

However, within just one year, 20 people using Invokana and similar inhibitors were treated for an unusual and typically uncommon blood malady known as ketoacidosis. This dangerous condition occurs when too much acid in the blood leads to kidney failure and possibly heart failure. In the 20 known cases of ketoacidosis, 100% of them required emergency room treatment or other forms of hospitalization.

The FDA is extensively investigating these 20 cases to determine if there is an irrefutable link to Invokana. It is believed that the rapidity of sugar removal from the blood through the kidneys causes a dangerous imbalance and a spike in acidity, leading to ketoacidosis.

If you have type 2 diabetes and take Invokana or other inhibitors, you need to be particularly aware of the following symptoms of ketoacidosis:

  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Disorientation
  • Drowsiness/fatigue
  • Labored breathing

It is of dire importance that if you do suspect you may be suffering from or developing ketoacidosis due to Invokana you do not stop taking your medication without first consulting your physician. Only your doctor or another medical professional should make the decision of altering your treatment.

You should, however, speak to a Raleigh dangerous drug attorney from the Whitley Law Firm today to see if you might have a potential claim against the makers of Invokana.

(If you would like more information regarding the FDA’s announcement and investigation, as well as a list of SGLT2 inhibitors that might be causing ketoacidosis, click here.)